Posts Tagged "Waradah Aboriginal Centre"

Traditional Aboriginal Hunting Tool: The Boomerang

Traditional Aboriginal Hunting Tool: The Boomerang

  Aboriginal people have an intimate understanding of their natural environment – as evident in their stories, songs, dances, and artwork. Though Aboriginal people’s tools vary by group and location, they share common characteristics such as knives, scrapers, ax-heads, spears, various vessels for eating and drinking, and digging sticks. In this post, we’ll be focusing on the most famous Aboriginal hunting tool: the boomerang. There are two types of boomerangs: The Returning Boomerang.   Arguably, the most iconic Aboriginal implement, the returning boomerang is...

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Understanding Desert Art.

Desert art (also known as dot painting) is recognised internationally as an integral part of Aboriginal Art.  The artists are from central and western desert, approx 230km radius of Alice Springs. Click Here To View Other Aboriginal Artwork   Though visually beautiful, the paintings have a deeper purpose. Using an aerial view and iconography, they are part of the Dreaming stories related to the artist’s country and the cultural teachings passed down from ancestral spirits. Traditionally the paintings were created for Ceremonies. Ceremonies are like schools for Aboriginal people....

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Acclaimed Aboriginal artist, Greg Weatherby chooses Waradah as a stockist.

  Greg Weatherby’s father is a Yuin man from Maruya in NSW’s South Coast, and his mother was an English woman. Greg’s talents as an artist became apparent from an early age, whilst living in a boy’s home with his four brothers. At the time, the nun’s forced him to paint religious pictures. Upon leaving, Greg became interested in learning about his Aboriginal heritage. Travelling his father’s country, he attended ceremonies, learnt the ways of his ancestors, and collected dreamtime stories, which he transcribed into his paintings. Today, Greg is a...

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Three Core Aboriginal Lore: Love, Respect and Humility.

“Aboriginal spirituality is defined as at the core of Aboriginal being, their very identity. It gives meaning to all aspects of life including relationships with one another and the environment. All objects are living and share the same soul and spirit as Aboriginals. There is a kinship with the environment. Aboriginal spirituality can be expressed visually, musically and ceremonially.” (Grant, E.K. 2004) The traditional concepts of love, respect and humility form the foundation of the Aboriginal way of life. They are built around acknowledging everything in nature as sacred....

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Auntie Sally Beale

Auntie Sally Beale

Sally Beale is a descendant of the Angedool Ularoi Tribe, located on the New South Wales and Queensland border. Sally has been making jewellery for many years, using materials sourced from traditional Aboriginal bush tucker such as echidna quills and emu feathers, as well as Quandong seeds which she combines to make her unique Australian jewellery. Sally, along with her daughter, Kerrie, and granddaughters, collect the material from the surrounding stations close to their home.     Auntie Sally incorporates Quandong seeds with gumnut seeds which she collects during the warmer...

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