Posts Tagged "Farid Nayer"

Feature Artist: Stan Brumby

  Stan Brumby   Stan Brumby was born and grew up in Halls Creek during the 1930’s. He then worked as a stockman for most of his life on many of the main stations across the Kinberly and northern Territory – Legune, Newry, Rosewood, Argyle, Auvergne, Bradshaw and Victoria River Downs.   Stan was a highly respected Jaru Elder and known teacher of his language and culture. He began sharing his cultural knowledge through art during the 1990’s. From his grandfather he inherited custodial ownership of the Wolf creek Crater area south of Halls Creek. This area features prominently in many of...

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The Story of Mother Earth – Uncle Pete

The Story of Mother Earth – Uncle Pete

The Story of Mother Earth. Artist: Uncle Pete The style of artwork used in retelling of this story comes from our mountain, Gunda Booka, on the road between Bourke and Cobar, NSW.  Our people have been using this style of artwork on cave walls since the beginning of time. The hand stencils are signatures we leave on the cave walls to let others know that we’ve travelled through on our way to ceremonies. The colours, too, have their own significance. The red ochre  is used by men who’ve attended ceremonies. For my people, the red ochre represents the blood of God, Mooka. Women who’ve attended...

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Acknowledgement Of Country & Welcome to Country

Protocols for welcoming visitors to country have been a part of Aboriginal culture for thousands of years. Despite the absence of fences or visible borders, Aboriginal groups had clear boundaries separating their countries. Permission was needed by travellers when crossing into another group’s country – similar to obtaining a visa. When permission was granted, the hosting group would welcome the visitors, offering them safe passage.     An acknowledgement of country is a protocol performed preceding an official meeting or formal activity. It acknowledges the Aboriginal...

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Traditional Aboriginal Hunting Tool: The Boomerang

Traditional Aboriginal Hunting Tool: The Boomerang

  Aboriginal people have an intimate understanding of their natural environment – as evident in their stories, songs, dances, and artwork. Though Aboriginal people’s tools vary by group and location, they share common characteristics such as knives, scrapers, ax-heads, spears, various vessels for eating and drinking, and digging sticks. In this post, we’ll be focusing on the most famous Aboriginal hunting tool: the boomerang. There are two types of boomerangs: The Returning Boomerang.   Arguably, the most iconic Aboriginal implement, the returning boomerang is...

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Understanding Desert Art.

Desert art (also known as dot painting) is recognised internationally as an integral part of Aboriginal Art.  The artists are from central and western desert, approx 230km radius of Alice Springs. Click Here To View Other Aboriginal Artwork   Though visually beautiful, the paintings have a deeper purpose. Using an aerial view and iconography, they are part of the Dreaming stories related to the artist’s country and the cultural teachings passed down from ancestral spirits. Traditionally the paintings were created for Ceremonies. Ceremonies are like schools for Aboriginal people....

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