Posts Tagged "Aboriginal Art"

Acclaimed Aboriginal artist, Greg Weatherby chooses Waradah as a stockist.

  Greg Weatherby’s father is a Yuin man from Maruya in NSW’s South Coast, and his mother was an English woman. Greg’s talents as an artist became apparent from an early age, whilst living in a boy’s home with his four brothers. At the time, the nun’s forced him to paint religious pictures. Upon leaving, Greg became interested in learning about his Aboriginal heritage. Travelling his father’s country, he attended ceremonies, learnt the ways of his ancestors, and collected dreamtime stories, which he transcribed into his paintings. Today, Greg is a...

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Auntie Sally Beale

Auntie Sally Beale

Sally Beale is a descendant of the Angedool Ularoi Tribe, located on the New South Wales and Queensland border. Sally has been making jewellery for many years, using materials sourced from traditional Aboriginal bush tucker such as echidna quills and emu feathers, as well as Quandong seeds which she combines to make her unique Australian jewellery. Sally, along with her daughter, Kerrie, and granddaughters, collect the material from the surrounding stations close to their home.     Auntie Sally incorporates Quandong seeds with gumnut seeds which she collects during the warmer...

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Life-size Mannequins from Santa Teresa.

Life-size Mannequins from Santa Teresa.

Keringke Arts in the remote Northern Territory community of Santa Teresa, produces a wide variety of art products, reflecting the colour, rhythm and ambience of the land that is home for the Eastern Arrernte artists. The artists are represented nationally and internationally in many collections, and the work is prized for its unique style and authentic connection to an ancient living culture. The artists at Kerengke Arts use pattern, colour, shape and design to create artwork depicting country, culture and self.The shapes and designs in the art pieces commonly share features with ancient...

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What is a Coolamon?

Coolamon is a bowl (a curved wooden tray) which has been used by many Aboriginal tribes especially the women as a gathering tool. Coolemon is primarily used as a dish to hold food, in the case of deep Coolamon, it can also be used as water carrier or even a rocker for putting babies to sleep.   Coolamon can be an oval cut-out of bark of some trees or a chunk of trunk or root of some trees that is scooped out by Aboriginal men or women. Box tree, Gidgee tree (some Acacia species), red gum tree etc. are often amongst the timbers used in coolamons. Waradah’s gallery sources authentic...

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The Education Room Gets a Facelift

Over the past few weeks, Waradah Aboriginal Centre has undertaken refurbishments to it’s Education Room, to the value of $10,000. These include: Five 42 inch screens featuring videos of Kevin Rudd’s apology, interviews with Elders and Indigenous artists painting on canvas. Audio visual guides replacing plaques explaining the various Aboriginal tools and weapons. The Australian, Aboriginal and Torres Island flags added to the garden wall. Additional Garden Wall and aged wood framing around information posters. The changes are designed to make the room both visually more appealing and...

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