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News Items for the main centre

Understanding Aboriginal Dreaming.

Australian Aborigines have the longest continuous cultural history of any group of people on Earth – over 65,000 years. There’s never been an adequate translation in the English language to sufficiently define everything embodied by Aboriginal Dreamings. Guided by their Ancestral Spirits, the Aboriginal people have developed an intimate knowledge of and belonging to the land. They are entrusted to watch over and protect the land. This bond, this rich spiritual connection, is known as the Dreaming. The Dreaming stories are linked to the creation time and the Ancestral Spirits who...

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Life-size Mannequins from Santa Teresa.

Life-size Mannequins from Santa Teresa.

Keringke Arts in the remote Northern Territory community of Santa Teresa, produces a wide variety of art products, reflecting the colour, rhythm and ambience of the land that is home for the Eastern Arrernte artists. The artists are represented nationally and internationally in many collections, and the work is prized for its unique style and authentic connection to an ancient living culture. The artists at Kerengke Arts use pattern, colour, shape and design to create artwork depicting country, culture and self.The shapes and designs in the art pieces commonly share features with ancient...

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What is a Coolamon?

Coolamon is a bowl (a curved wooden tray) which has been used by many Aboriginal tribes especially the women as a gathering tool. Coolemon is primarily used as a dish to hold food, in the case of deep Coolamon, it can also be used as water carrier or even a rocker for putting babies to sleep.   Coolamon can be an oval cut-out of bark of some trees or a chunk of trunk or root of some trees that is scooped out by Aboriginal men or women. Box tree, Gidgee tree (some Acacia species), red gum tree etc. are often amongst the timbers used in coolamons. Waradah’s gallery sources authentic...

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Explore the Unique Features of Aboriginal Culture at Waradah.

Explore the Unique Features of Aboriginal Culture at Waradah.

Australian Aborigines have a long tradition of storey telling. In the absence of a written language, important cultural and sacred knowledge is passed down by Elders through Dreaming stories, song, dance and art. The Dreaming (or Dreamtime) incorporates the past, present and future. Each Aboriginal person is intricately connected to Country through their ancestral Dreamings and totems (sacred emblems chosen by ancestral beings which symbolise the group). Australian Aborigines learn the Dreaming Stories through travel, song, ritual and art.     We at Waradah Aboriginal Centre, have...

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Reconciliation Week 2017

Reconciliation Week 2017

National Reconciliation Week runs from 27 May – 3 June. These dates mark two milestones in Australia’s reconciliation journey: the 1967 referendum and the historic 1992 Mabo decision, respectively. It is a significant week in Australian life for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people to get together and learn more about each other. In 1967, the Australians voted overwhelmingly to amend the constitution to include Aboriginal people in the census and allow the Commonwealth to create laws for them. In 1992, Eddie Mabo successfully challenged the Australian legal system and fought for recognition...

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The Education Room Gets a Facelift

Over the past few weeks, Waradah Aboriginal Centre has undertaken refurbishments to it’s Education Room, to the value of $10,000. These include: Five 42 inch screens featuring videos of Kevin Rudd’s apology, interviews with Elders and Indigenous artists painting on canvas. Audio visual guides replacing plaques explaining the various Aboriginal tools and weapons. The Australian, Aboriginal and Torres Island flags added to the garden wall. Additional Garden Wall and aged wood framing around information posters. The changes are designed to make the room both visually more appealing and...

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