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Three Core Aboriginal Lore: Love, Respect and Humility.

“Aboriginal spirituality is defined as at the core of Aboriginal being, their very identity. It gives meaning to all aspects of life including relationships with one another and the environment. All objects are living and share the same soul and spirit as Aboriginals. There is a kinship with the environment. Aboriginal spirituality can be expressed visually, musically and ceremonially.” (Grant, E.K. 2004) The traditional concepts of love, respect and humility form the foundation of the Aboriginal way of life. They are built around acknowledging everything in nature as sacred....

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Auntie Sally Beale

Auntie Sally Beale

Sally Beale is a descendant of the Angedool Ularoi Tribe, located on the New South Wales and Queensland border. Sally has been making jewellery for many years, using materials sourced from traditional Aboriginal bush tucker such as echidna quills and emu feathers, as well as Quandong seeds which she combines to make her unique Australian jewellery. Sally, along with her daughter, Kerrie, and granddaughters, collect the material from the surrounding stations close to their home.     Auntie Sally incorporates Quandong seeds with gumnut seeds which she collects during the warmer...

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Understanding Aboriginal Dreaming.

Australian Aborigines have the longest continuous cultural history of any group of people on Earth – over 65,000 years. There’s never been an adequate translation in the English language to sufficiently define everything embodied by Aboriginal Dreamings. Guided by their Ancestral Spirits, the Aboriginal people have developed an intimate knowledge of and belonging to the land. They are entrusted to watch over and protect the land. This bond, this rich spiritual connection, is known as the Dreaming. The Dreaming stories are linked to the creation time and the Ancestral Spirits who...

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What is a Coolamon?

Coolamon is a bowl (a curved wooden tray) which has been used by many Aboriginal tribes especially the women as a gathering tool. Coolemon is primarily used as a dish to hold food, in the case of deep Coolamon, it can also be used as water carrier or even a rocker for putting babies to sleep.   Coolamon can be an oval cut-out of bark of some trees or a chunk of trunk or root of some trees that is scooped out by Aboriginal men or women. Box tree, Gidgee tree (some Acacia species), red gum tree etc. are often amongst the timbers used in coolamons. Waradah’s gallery sources authentic...

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Explore the Unique Features of Aboriginal Culture at Waradah.

Explore the Unique Features of Aboriginal Culture at Waradah.

Australian Aborigines have a long tradition of storey telling. In the absence of a written language, important cultural and sacred knowledge is passed down by Elders through Dreaming stories, song, dance and art. The Dreaming (or Dreamtime) incorporates the past, present and future. Each Aboriginal person is intricately connected to Country through their ancestral Dreamings and totems (sacred emblems chosen by ancestral beings which symbolise the group). Australian Aborigines learn the Dreaming Stories through travel, song, ritual and art.     We at Waradah Aboriginal Centre, have...

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Reconciliation Week 2017

Reconciliation Week 2017

National Reconciliation Week runs from 27 May – 3 June. These dates mark two milestones in Australia’s reconciliation journey: the 1967 referendum and the historic 1992 Mabo decision, respectively. It is a significant week in Australian life for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people to get together and learn more about each other. In 1967, the Australians voted overwhelmingly to amend the constitution to include Aboriginal people in the census and allow the Commonwealth to create laws for them. In 1992, Eddie Mabo successfully challenged the Australian legal system and fought for recognition...

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